Meet the Instructor – Jena Sawyer

Meet the Instructor – Jena Sawyer

Jena’s journey into yoga, meditation, and mindful movement started many years ago in pursuit of stress relief and a better night’s sleep. She has spent countless hours studying, exploring, learning, and cultivating practical applications and relatable perspectives. She loves to share these and is enthusiastic about helping others travel their own unique path to well-being.

Her passion is helping people create more ease… in their mind, body, relationships, work, and life. She urges them to start wherever they are rather waiting for the elusive someday.  Her “option-rich” classes center on breath and awareness, with suggestions for variations and encouragement of personal exploration in each posture.

Jena teaches classes for the Highlands Ranch Recreation Centers and also offers coaching, workshops, and retreats. Her self-published book, Yoga Thinking, offers tools and techniques to help modern-day yogis apply yoga’s wisdom to their everyday life.

Join Jena and all of our amazing instructors this  summer at Free Yoga in the Park, starting Saturday May 27, 2017 from 8:15-9:15 hosted by NamasteWorks Yoga + Wellness and the Highlands Ranch Metro Districts.  For more details on the remaining schedule and what to bring, visit http://namasteworksyoga.com/events.

Meet Free Yoga in the Park Instructor – Kate Roberts

Meet Free Yoga in the Park Instructor – Kate Roberts

If there was ever a survivor story that blended the benefits of yoga, it’s Kate Roberts story of meeting life again through her practice. She began her life-long love of Yoga after being severely injured in a 2000 car crash, and found that it helped her to find ‘balance’ (figuratively and literally) in her life as she recovered from her injuries and completed college.      Kate is a Certified Yoga Instructor and eared her 200-HR Integrative Yoga therapy certification from NamasteWorks Yoga + Wellness.  Kate earned a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Human and Health Performance—Health Promotion, and a Minor in Art from Montana State University Billings in 2010. She enjoys gardening, reading, arts and crafts, and walking, playing and pretty much doing everything with her dog Maggie.

Join Kate and all of our amazing instructors this  summer at Free Yoga in the Park, starting Saturday May 27, 2017 from 8:15-9:15 hosted by NamasteWorks Yoga + Wellness and the Highlands Ranch Metro Districts.  For more details on the remaining schedule and what to bring, visit http://namasteworksyoga.com/events.

 

 

Easing PTSD with Yoga-based Trauma Therapy – A Personal Journey

A commentary by Kate Roberts – a recent graduate of the 200 HR Integrative Yoga Therapy training at NamasteWorks Yoga + Wellness.

I came to Yoga by way of a car crash that nearly killed me, ending life as I knew it and the life that I had planned. I was 20 and had just discovered who I wanted to be and where I wanted my life to go when I earned by EMT-B certification with the intention of enrolling in nursing school when I returned to college. All that changed on July 16, 2000, when I visited my sister’s family on their ranch in Paradise Valley, MT, to meet their newest edition, Tyler, while on my days off from Lake Hospital in Yellowstone National Park. After driving to Emigrant for pizza and a movie my sister’s car was run off the 75 mph highway by an oncoming motorist in too big of a hurry and passing a motor home on a double-yellow line. My four month old nephew and I were both flown to St. Vincent Hospital in Billings, MT, where he was pronounced brain-dead and I underwent brain- and various other- surgeries to save my life. I was placed in a medically-induced coma for one of the two months I was in the hospital, opening my eyes for the first time on my Dad’s birthday, August 8th. Rehabilitation began while I was still an In-patient, doing such things as re-learning how to walk and how to hold an eating utensil. After my discharge, I continued rehabilitation with four more grueling months of physical therapy, speech therapy, and occupational therapy. I was then spit-out of the medical system a fully-formed and healed adult… except that I wasn’t.

The American Psychological Association defines trauma as “an emotional response to” a negative event in one’s life. According to Judith Herman (1992) in Trauma and Recovery, traumatized individuals can range anywhere from a raped college student to a military combat soldier, from a car crash survivor to a grown man who was sexually abused as a child, from a prisoner-of-war to a housewife who is a prisoner in her own home. Survivors of trauma often suffer from a plethora of debilitating side-effects and symptoms which negatively impact their “quality of life” and are collectively known as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, or PTSD (Emerson et al., 2009; Sparrowe, 2011).

Findings from studies by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and others have shown Yoga-based trauma therapy to ease the “fight-or-flight” response (e.g. increased heart and respiration rates) triggered by the body’s sympathetic nervous system, which is a problematic and intrusive symptom among those suffering from PTSD (Emerson et al., 2009; Sparrowe, 2011). Trauma-sensitive Yoga was found to positively affect how patients were able to self-regulate (“calm down”) and reduce distressing physical and emotional symptoms when used in conjunction with traditional therapy methods in the treatment of trauma-induced PTSD (Sparrowe, 2011).

About three years after suffering my Traumatic Brain Injury, and while attending community classes in preparation for returning to college, I found Yoga. At my eldest sister’s prompting, my Mom suggested I attend a Yoga class—even researching where and when—until I finally acquiesced. It was a community class that consisted of women my Mom’s age. Unbeknownst to me at the time, the building and room used for the class, as well as the Yoga instructor, were all highly suitable for a Trauma-sensitive Yoga class (Emerson et al., 2009). The location of the building was one of safety for me, as it sat next the St. Vincent campus; the environment within the building was one of reverence, hushed but welcoming; the Yoga room contained no windows and no mirrors, had adequate but low lighting, and there was minimal outside noise; the instructor was friendly, welcoming, and very knowledgeable—everything I needed at this time in my life when nothing felt normal, including me.

Because survivors of trauma often dissociate from their bodies, the objective of Trauma-sensitive Yoga is to reacquaint a survivor with sensations in their body, which is similar to what I was doing at this time in my recovery: I was not only re-learning how to inhabit and maneuver my physical body, but I was also re-learning how to mentally re-connect with sensations in my body (Sparrowe, 2011). This was a loving and gentle Yoga class, where modifications for each body type were taught and encouraged.

Yoga taught me how to re-inhabit my body fully, how to interpret and regulate how I react to sensations, and how to embrace the new “me”.

Sparrowe, L. (2011). Transcending Trauma. Yoga International magazine. Retrieved from this source.  http://www.traumacenter.org/products/pdf_files/yoga_transcending_trauma.pdf

Emerson et al. (2009). Trauma-Sensitive Yoga: Principles, Practice, and Research. International Journal of Yoga Therapy, 19. Retrieved from this source.   http://givebackyoga.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Trauma-IJYT-Article_.pdf

Herman, J. L. (1992). Trauma and Recovery. Retrieved from this source.   https://www.uic.edu/classes/psych/psych270/PTSD.htm

American Psychological Association. (n.d.) Retrieved from this source.   http://www.apa.org/topics/trauma/

Bio PictKate Roberts is a Certified Yoga Instructor as well as 200-RYT certified. She began practicing Yoga after being severely injured in a 2000 car crash, when she found that it helped her find ‘balance’ in her life as she recovered from her injuries and completed college. Kate earned a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Human and Health Performance—Health Promotion Option and a Minor in Art at Montana State University Billings in 2010.  Kate recently completed her 200HR Integrative Yoga Therapy training at NamasteWorks Yoga + Wellness adding therapeutic yoga to her teaching skills.  She enjoys gardening, reading, arts-crafts, and walking her dog Maggie.